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Construction Career Resources help Educators inspire Students

Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, Minnesota students will not be returning to school for in-person classes for the rest of this year.

And, depending upon what happens with the spread of the virus, there’s a chance that shelter-in-place orders may be imposed next fall or winter, resulting in students learning via online.

For teachers looking to introduce their students to the world of construction – there’s a new source for you.

The Construction Careers Foundation, a Twin Cities nonprofit, is now offering teachers a growing list of free educational resources to help middle-school and high-school teachers about construction. These resources include:

● Videos
● Powerpoint presentations
● Posters
● Flyers, and
● Online information

Under the “Program” tab on the Constructioncareers.org website, educators will find the a resource page created just for them — View the “For Teachers” page.

These free resources can help students understand the role of construction and building trades professionals in creating our roads, bridges, schools, hospitals, homes and office buildings.

“These tools can help students better understand how they can pursue a career in the construction trades – similar to the steps students need to take to enter college or the military,” said Sarah Lechowich, senior director for the Construction Careers Foundation.

The “For Teachers” page has resources for in-class activities and accommodates online learning by offering construction stories and posters to help teach students about the apprenticeship process. (Photo Credit: Emily Sweeney)

Educating Parents Too

ConstructionCareers.org is also a tool educators and guidance counselors can use to help parents of high school students better understand apprenticeship opportunities and the positive benefits of a career in the construction trades.

“We are contacted by parents who are actively helping their child plan out and search for the next step after high school,” Lechowhich said. “They see the high costs of college and they also see students who enjoy building things more than studying in a classroom. Our website and programs can provide the information they need to better answer career questions for students.”

What many parents and students also don’t know is that Minnesota has more than 30 different construction trades careers. Educators, parents and students can read about each careers’ wages, apprenticeship offerings, key skills and benefits on the Careers page.

“Your child might not be able to sit in a classroom – maybe your child loves to do hands-on projects, or draw, or excels in math and science when they see real-world results,” Lechowhich said. “These are valuable traits in the construction industry and our job is to connect Minnesota’s young people with those career opportunities – both online and in the classroom.”